About the conference

For the 9th time, Helmholtz Munich is organizing this high-impact conference series, taking place at Künstlerhaus in the heart of Munich this year, during the Oktoberfest.

Internationally leading scientists in diabetes research are joining us here in Munich to present and discuss their most recent data and achievements. Our overriding goal is to find new ways for the prevention and treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This conference will focus on the latest therepies in diabetes. The world’s leading faculty in this area will thus enrich this year’s program. Following our long-standing tradition, we will feature again the HelDi (Helmholtz Young Investigator in Diabetes) competition with selected talks by rising stars in the field of diabetes, and the presentation of the Helmholtz Diabetes Lecture. This year, Rudolf Zechner (University of Graz) will receive this award in recognition of his life-time achievements.

About the conference

The organizers

Stephan Herzig

Stephan Herzig

is Scientific Director of the Helmholtz Diabetes Center (HDC) and the Institute for Diabetes and Cancer (IDC). His lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of diabetes and develops novel, organ-specific compounds to counteract insulin resistance, glucose tolerance and other components of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, he explores the association between cancer development and metabolic dysfunction.

Matthias Tschöp

Matthias Tschöp

is Chief Executive Officer and Scientific Director of Helmholtz Munich and a physician-scientist. He has developed several novel classes of drug candidates to prevent or reverse obesity, diabetes and metabolic diseases. These so-called gut-hormone poly-agonists show best-in-class anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects and first candidates are under review for regulatory approval.

Ruth Gimeno

Ruth Gimeno

leads research efforts in diabetes and complications for Eli Lilly and Company with responsibility for projects from discovery through the end of Phase 2.  Her current research includes next generation insulins and incretins, novel targets for diabetes and weight loss, as well as projects in cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease and NASH.

<h2><a href="https://www.helmholtz-munich.de/helmholtz-zentrum-muenchen/index.html">Helmholtz Munich</a></h2>
<p class="layerContent">Helmholtz Munich, the German Research Center for Environmental Health, develops efficient methods for the early detection, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of important common diseases that arise from the interaction between the environment and individual genetic backgrounds. <strong>One major focus of the Center is on diabetes.</strong></p>
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Helmholtz Munich

Helmholtz Munich, the German Research Center for Environmental Health, develops efficient methods for the early detection, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of important common diseases that arise from the interaction between the environment and individual genetic backgrounds. One major focus of the Center is on diabetes.

 

 

<h2><a href="https://www.kuenstlerhaus-muc.de/english/">Venue: Künstlerhaus</a></h2>
<p>The Künstlerhaus, located in the heart of Munich, was conceived as a meeting place for artists and society alike and is still living proof of the style and society model of its time of origin when prince regent Luitpold opened the house to the public in 1900. After some glorious decades of festivities, masked balls and banquets the house burned down following a bombing raid in 1944. It was rebuilt and re-opened to the public by Duke Albrecht of Bavaria on October 1, 1961. Today it is open for a wide variety of congresses, festivities, and exhibitions.</p>

Venue: Künstlerhaus

The Künstlerhaus, located in the heart of Munich, was conceived as a meeting place for artists and society alike and is still living proof of the style and society model of its time of origin when prince regent Luitpold opened the house to the public in 1900. After some glorious decades of festivities, masked balls and banquets the house burned down following a bombing raid in 1944. It was rebuilt and re-opened to the public by Duke Albrecht of Bavaria on October 1, 1961. Today it is open for a wide variety of congresses, festivities, and exhibitions.

 

Social Media

Social Media

Hashtag:
#Helmholtz­Di­a­betes2022

Twitter:
@HelmholtzMunich (Helmholtz Munich)
@Helmholtz_diabc (Helmholtz Diabetes Center)

Photography

Photography

By participating or attending this event, you agree that you may appear on photos and/or videos which might be used for Helmholtz Zentrum München's public relations activities.